Ethics & Morality

Ethics & Morality


Character Matters In Our Leaders and In Ourselves

character November 9th, 2018

I miss Ronald Reagan. That is not something that I say often. But as of this writing, the 2018 midterm elections just occurred, the Russia probe of Trump is about to drop, and the majority of Republicans remaining in Congress are extremists. There was a kind of class about that old coot Reagan, and it’s sorely missing now in the Commander in Chief. Character is all-important in everyone, but especially in the American President, a position that has increased in importance beyond the Founders’ intentions, and one that is of great power and influence.

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Climate Change Quotes (Global Warming Quotes)

climate change November 1st, 2018

I was talking with a friend about illegal immigration, and I was thinking, We non-politician citizens here in America are damned dumb if we worry about these alleged Middle Easterners and welfare sponges and criminals heading toward our country and ignore our more serious problems. For example, Conor Lynch enlightes as to the clear and present danger of climate change (global warming): “Hurricane Florence is devastating the Carolinas, and … Republican lawmakers in both North and South Carolina are notorious for their climate denialism and have done little to prepare for the impact that a changing climate will have on their states. One can only hope that the very real storms we are witnessing today will convince Americans across the political spectrum that we must address the clear and present danger of climate change before it’s too late.” I live in coastal South Carolina, and this guy is spot-on. I wish Republicans at the national and local level (politicians, that is) would stop using wedge issues and other techniques to distract from pressing issues such as the steel trap of climate change. Click through to find interesting quotes about global warming and climate change to inspire your thinking.

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Magnanimity & Altruism: Saving 50 Jews from Death

magnanimity October 4th, 2018

Eleanor and Gilbert Kraus are very likely two of the greatest unsung heroes in American history – at least, in Jewish history. I watched a documentary about their courageous acts (in 1939), which amounted to nothing less than a full-throated display of magnanimity and altruism. Here is their story. I will also include a selection of quotations about magnanimity by noted Holocaust survivors, human rights activists, altruism researchers, and stalwart exemplars of virtue and honor such as Elie Wiesel, Nelson Mandela, Anne Frank, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Viktor Frankl. 

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Aristotle’s View of Humanity’s Highest Aspirations

humanity's highest aspirations September 15th, 2018

Aristotle is the grandfather of ethics and human flourishing; his book The Nicomachean Ethics has been a classic read in philosophy and ethics courses at universities since about 340 B.C.E. He studied with Plato and is largely credited with inventing logic and natural science. In this blog, I will share a brief outline of Aristotle’s first section entitled “The Human Good”, including a few quotations about humanity’s highest virtues.

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The Nature of Values According to Socrates

the nature of values according to Socrates September 8th, 2018

In 399 B.C.E., the year Socrates was put on trial in ancient Athens, he met a prosecutor (for lack of a better word) on the steps of the Court of Archon. His name was Euthyphro, and, astonishingly, he was prosecuting his very own father for murder. He felt it would be “pollution” to allow his father to go unpunished; a stain upon his good name. They get to talking, and soon Socrates has the arrogant man in his grasp. This blog is about the nature of values according to Socrates, which is essentially Socratic dialogue. The question being explored, specifically, is whether goodness is goodness because the Ancient Greek gods want it to be so, or do they see goodness when they look upward, just like we humans do?

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What is Wisdom? A Diverse Group of Skills

what is wisdom? September 1st, 2018

Second in a series called What is Wisdom?, this blog seeks to provide some more definition to the concept. Wisdom is one of those skills/values that is difficult to understand and to define. In the first segment of this series, I approached the question what is wisdom? by noting it is an ability to correctly predict outcomes. This second segment takes a cue from the noted philosopher Robert Nozick’s book The Examined Life; specifically, his twenty-third chapter entitled “What is Wisdom? Why Do Philosophers Love It So?”

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OF COURSE Healthcare is a Right!

health care is a right August 24th, 2018

There is a question about whether or not a citizen having health insurance adequate to cover most any operation or medical procedure that is needed or certainly affects the quality of life. You can hear it when a liberal and a libertarian discuss political philosophy and economics. One will say, “No one has a right to receive any good costing thousands of dollars from ‘society’ because they need to work for what they want and need. Everyone is responsible for themselves.” The other will retort “Every other industrialized nation in the world provides medical care to its citizens; it’s up there with a 40-hour work week (or less), maternity leave, and the right to unionize in the workplace.” I mostly side with the latter; I do believe that healthcare is a right. That is, I believe that everyone in the United States should have some form of health insurance, the least of which being some kind of single-payer system (e.g., Medicare). Here are my reasons, and I have some quotes indicating healthcare is a right to back me up.

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Podcasts on Values and Ethics Available Here

podcasts on values and ethics August 20th, 2018

Values of the Wise features 85 podcasts on values and ethics, such as interviews with experts on politics, sustainability, morality, personal growth, etc. If you want to hear conversations that philosophical thinker and adept interviewer Jason Merchey conducts with experts, thought leaders, authors, and wise individuals (in 45 minutes), look no further. 

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Acting Morally is About Deliberation & Practice

acting morally August 15th, 2018

As of this writing, what must be the most significant, most horrific, most appalling case of child molestation and cover-up by the Catholic Church just hit the papers. Grand jurors in Pennsylvania found that over seven decades 300 priests molested over 1,000 children. This is just beyond the pale. This is not a blog about the ineptitude or depravity of the Church of Rome, though, this is about making moral decisions, dealing with moral dilemmas, and acting morally when one faces a choice of two or more alternatives in the moral realm. In a word, What is the right thing to do?

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Cultivating Virtue & Living Wisely

virtue August 2nd, 2018

Cultivating virtue helps us to live well, and within reason. But how are we to understand the kind of guardrails reason provides? Why suppose that reason can govern action and emotion in the way that modern Aristotelian theorists of virtue seem to suggest that it can? After all, there is an impressive body of empirical research suggesting that people frequently fail to live up to their own ideals. In this blog, Professor Candace Vogler writes about reason, virtue, and living wisely.

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