Wisdom

Wisdom


American Values: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly

American values July 19th, 2018

Why is the tragically stupid effort at separating asylum seekers and folks trying to cross the border illegally now a thing? What does it say about America? What have our values been in the past, and what should the wise person make of that? What are America’s real values? This blog is about the fraying social fabric and the society-wide cognitive dissonance it accompanies. I am trying to really understand what full scope of American values are. Here is a taste: “I’ve recently been thinking and writing about the growing fragmentation of the social compact, of whatever it was this country had ever meant when it called itself a democracy: the shredding of the vision of government of the people, by the people, for the people” ~ Adrienne Rich.

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The Meaning of Life Always Involves Value/s

meaning of July 11th, 2018

The following is a guest blog about the meaning of life by philosopher Iddo Landau, Ph.D. He teaches philosophy at the University of Haifa, Israel. This essay is adapted from his new book, Finding Meaning in an Imperfect World, by Oxford University Press.

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Perfectionism, Mental Health, & Values

perfectionism July 9th, 2018

Perfectionism is essentially defined as an obsessive and unrealistic concern with being perfect, performing extraordinarily highly, consistently scoring ahead of the curve, and appearing above criticism to others. It’s living a life where one judges one’s actions with a magnifying glass, rarely satisfied with the performance. It can lead for performance anxiety and other “maladaptive” behaviors. It sucks, basically. It has a bit of a silver lining – one can turn out a great piece of writing, look friggin’ great, or really impress someone – but it’s a high price to pay. One perceives oneself as “missing” the bulls-eye twenty times for every hit. It’s sort of like living with a critical parent in your head. As I write this, not far from midnight, I am tired and barely able to accomplish the task, but I won’t go to bed, feeling like I am not trying hard enough, or not tough enough to hack it. In this blog, I explore perfectionism, and point out that it is related to values. 

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Quotations About Hope, Optimism, Doubt & Skepticism

quotations about hope July 2nd, 2018

The question I want to explore in this blog is whether life is worthy of hope and optimism. Conversely, perhaps you tend to feel that humankind’s existence is more fraught with difficulty, absurdity, despair, and deserves a skeptical and doubtful attitude. One can marshal quotations about hope and quotes about doubt to cast a favorable light on one’s predetermined conclusions. I urge you to suspend your judgment and view the following quotations about hope and skepticism with an open mind. I am of the opinion that the philosophical question of what the nature of life is is a bit hard to definitively determine. Well, here we go – a look at some very unique quotations about hope and an equal measure of apt doubt, skepticism, and pessimism quotes.

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Twenty Quotations Which Illustrate Values

quotations which illustrate values June 27th, 2018

What is meant by the phrase values of the wise?  I admit, it isn’t as intuitive as a phrase such as the values held by wise people or even that which those who are wise find valuable. But that is what it is meant to convey. When I see a person who is careful, open, clever, developed, self-controlled, passionate, lighthearted, loving, and perceptive, I think: wise. Wisdom. This blog features twenty unique and incisive quotations which illustrate values. Not just any values: values of the wise.

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Quotes About Wisdom, Philosophy, & Neuroscience

quotes about wisdom June 15th, 2018

Stephen S. Hall put out a very complete and (to me) compelling book entitled Wisdom: From Philosophy to Neuroscience. In it, he does a fine job of laying out a history of the subject, some of the hallmarks of what it is and what it isn’t, and brings some scientific findings in to enlighten and broaden the view. In this blog, I share some information considered to be “reviews” and then include many quotes about wisdom from the book. These are little-known, broad, intelligible, useful quotations, so I hope you appreciate them and add them to your collection. Oh, and read the book!

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Quotes About Living Life on Life’s Terms

living life on life's terms June 12th, 2018

As I noted in a previous blog about living life on life’s terms, one has to take a long, hard look at life and in the mirror and not blanch. One will find a high challenge there. “Life is a tragedy to those who think, and a comedy to those who feel,” noted French author La Bruyere long ago. But Drew D. Brown believed that “[y]ou don’t look in the mirror to see life; you’ve got to look out the window.” Thus, I wanted to follow up that first blog with this, a piece featuring quotes about “living life on life’s terms”. Enjoy this look at coping, self-realization, personal growth, inner strength, truth, insight, and realism.

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The Challenge of Living Life on Life’s Terms

life on life's terms June 7th, 2018

I was either born or molded into a perfectionist. I just wanted to put that out there. I also am, how should I say, not given to optimism. I do realize the power of an optimistic outlook. In fact, my stepfather is in his 80s and is known among friends and family as being able to ignore inconvenient truths and view the world through rose-colored glasses. Usually, I would look upon that with a certain disdain, as I studied psychological science and clinical practice, and took a number of classes at “the school of hard knocks,” if you will. This blog is about the challenge of optimism (for me at least).

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What is the Point and the Value of Education?

the value of education May 29th, 2018

I was reading a piece about the value of education; in other words, what its point is. As the story goes, “As a child, Freddie Sherrill had difficulty learning to read and write, and he began skipping school. As a teen, he became addicted to drugs and alcohol and started breaking into homes. After several stints in prison and rehab, Sherrill became sober in 1988, and rebuilt his life, repairing his relationships with his wife and children, learning how to read and write, and eventually, earning an associate’s degree.” It’s a wonderful story, one that goes a bit deeper. Read on to find out more about Mr. Sherrill and his wonderful story exemplifying the value of education, and why one should ideally engage in the process.

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Christian Capitalism and American Ignorance

Christian May 24th, 2018

Did you know that 55% of Americans believe that Christianity was written into the Constitution and that the founding fathers wanted One Nation Under Jesus (which includes 75% of Republicans and Evangelicals) (USA Today)? It is true that Puritan pilgrims came here seeking religious freedom, and that today we are one of the most religious of industrialized nations. But the fact that the vast majority of Americans think we are and are supposed to be “a Christian nation” is disconcerting, for two reasons. One, we certainly are not; America has slowly come to accept that religious pluralism and toleration and separation of church and state are ideals worth striving for. Some of the founding fathers were deistic and not particularly religious. But perhaps even more so, how can we be considered a Christian nation when we have this level of political chicanery, poverty, militarism, materialism, and greed? Those counter-ideals are literally antithetical to the message we believe Jesus was trying to convey during his brief time on Earth. This is a blog about the ignorance many Americans have, and even court.

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